September 2009

Lee Hazlewood: Some Other Guy

It’s hard to convince people that country music – and its related tributaries – aren’t all cow tippin’, sad stories and drinkin’. Well, some of it is, but the best of it can move past all that or even so succinctly relate some downer message as to come off as a creative music. Limited by instrumentation, the genre sometimes winds up falling into itself, unable to create new concepts. And if over produced, the results can be even worse. Luckily, Lee Hazlewood is able to add a buncha surprising instrumentation to his work, while still talking about lost love and a great deal of other genre stuff that could come off as tired. Cowboy In Sweden is many things, but played out is not one of ‘em.

I Belong To This Band: Scared Harp and Family Singin'

Sacred harp music is more and less than what it sounds like. At once, any listener is going to be struck by the power put behind every note and breath that’s necessitated by singing this music. But at the same time, it needs to be figured that this is a tradition as opposed to some creative outburst of new ideas. That shouldn’t lessen the enjoyment that anyone is able to have at the altar of I Belong To This Band: Eighty-Five Years Of Sacred Harp Recordings, but being aware of the fact that the artfulness in these works is imbued in the arrangements as opposed to the conception needs to be understood.

Taylor Swift,,, hang'n wit the wrong crowd?

Taylor,,, I hope you happen to see this.  What happened to you is EXACTLY why Country singers should stay within the realm of Country music so far as where they perform and receive awards.  The filthy, nasty and vulgar words of hip hop, rap and the like have NO BUSINESS being on the same stage at the same time as Country music professionals. 

 

The same thing goes for these so called "cross over" artist's!  It's like having a beautiful Tennessee Walker horse and deliberately breeding it with a pack mule or a jack ass! You get useless trash.

 

Country Music Fans $100.00 Contest

  This is a call for country music fans to SPREAD THE WORD  and email your friends regarding a country songwriter who need help in rating his songs. Please go to www.mynoisyplanet.com/LeonNewton

Please help SPREAD th WORD email your friends to help RATE THE SONGS. You can make it happen by bringing a new songwriter to the public music world. The power to make things happen with one person at a time. Country Music Fans email your friends and give me a chance to be heard. I appreciate your help.  Will send $100.00 to the person who write the best reason why they like the song and will post the winner on this blog. Contact: leonnewt@aol.com

Sincerely,

Songwriter Leon Newton

 

 

The Two Man Gentlemen Band: The Old Tyme Hook...

There are literally hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of bands out there trying to make a go of the music biz. Figuring out how to differentiate yourself and separate your music from the mass of stuffs out there is probably as daunting a task as actually creating the product. Some folks opt for combining two desperate genres and pretending that the result is some futuristic impulse prefiguring the next step in humanity and how music is heard and made. Usually that’s bunk – and it’s pretty clear too. But every once in a while a group shows up that is immediately unique (in a new music cohort at least) – The Two Man Gentlemen Band is that combo.

David Grisman x Andy Statman

Bluegrass, even in its hipper incarnation as newgrass, is generally perceived to be the stomping grounds for goyim (look it up). But with the pairing of David Grisman and Andy Statman, perhaps that notion about the genre should change. Of course, each of those players, prior to working together, had put in time in a variety of relatively influential groups dealing in Americana in one way or another (I dunno if the Grateful Dead count. Maybe). But each one of these men have such a broad interest in performance, instrumentation and music in general, that the dueling mandolin extravaganza that could have resulted, comes in as an experimental look at the instrument and what it’s capable of doing.